Organic Vegetables

chards

Swiss Chard contains an excellent source of vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin A (in the form of beta-carotene), the mineral manganese, and a strong source of the mineral zinc. This awesome vegetable has an exceptional mixture of conventional antioxidants. But these healthy antioxidants are only part of chard’s incredible health benefits with respect to prevention of oxidative stress and diseases related to chronic, unwanted oxidative stress. Equally outstanding are chard’s phytonutrient antioxidants. These phytonutrient antioxidants range from carotenoids like beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin to flavonoids like quercetin and kaempferol. But the range of phytonutrients in chard is even more extensive than researchers initially suspected, and at this point in time, about three dozen antioxidant phytonutrients have been identified in chard, including betalains (both betacyanins and betaxanthins) and epoxyxanthophylls. Many of these antioxidant phytonutrients provide chard with its colorful stems, stalks, and leaf veins. As a rule, the phytonutrient antioxidants in chard also act as anti-inflammatory agents. Sometimes they lower risk of chronic, unwanted inflammation by altering the activity of pro-inflammatory enzymes. At other times, they help prevent the production of pro-inflammatory messaging molecules. Because chronic low level inflammation (especially when coupled with excessive oxidative stress) has repeatedly been shown to increase our risk of obesity, atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, gastrointestinal diseases, and several forms of arthritis, chard is very likely to show up in future studies on humans as a key vegetable for lowering risk of these health problems.

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Kale is low in calories, high in fiber and has zero fat. One cup of kale has only 36 calories, 5 grams of fiber and 0 grams of fat. It’s great for assisting in digestion and defecation with its great fiber content. It’s also filled with so many nutrients, vitamins, folate and magnesium. Kale is high in iron. Per calorie, kale has more iron than beef. Iron is essential for good health, such as the formation of hemoglobin and enzymes, transporting oxygen to various parts of the body, cell growth, proper liver function and more. Kale is high in Vitamin K. Eating a diet high in Vitamin K can help protect against various diseases. It is also necessary for a wide variety of bodily functions including normal bone health and the prevention of blood clotting. Also increased levels of vitamin K can help people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. Kale is filled with powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants, such as carotenoids and flavonoids help protect against disease. Kale is a great anti-inflammatory food. One cup of kale is filled with 10% of the RDA of omega-3 fatty acids, which help, fight against arthritis, asthma and autoimmune disorders such as ulcerative colitis and Crohns disease. Kale is great for cardiovascular support. Eating more kale can help lower cholesterol levels. Kale is high in Vitamin A.Vitamin A is great for your vision, your skin as well as helping to prevent lung and oral cavity cancers. Kale is high in Vitamin C. This is very helpful for your immune system, your metabolism and your hydration. Kale is high in calcium. Per calorie, kale has more calcium than milk, which aids in preventing bone loss, preventing osteoporosis and maintaining a healthy metabolism since patients with colitis cannot absord calcium from dairy products. Vitamin C is also helpful to maintain cartilage and joint flexibility. Kale is filled with fiber and sulfur, both great for detoxifying your body and keeping your liver healthy.

strawberry

Health Benefits of Vitamin C (Strawberries) Eating low acidic fruits and vegetables, and paying attention to fiber will help guard against flair-ups. Although fiber is crucial to a healthy diet, some people with inflammatory bowel disease find that fiber makes symptoms worse. If fiber bothers you, steam or bake your vegetables instead of eating them raw, and avoid foods such as broccoli, cauliflower, and raw apples which are high in in fiber. Eat antioxidants foods, including fruits (such as blueberries, cherries, strawberries) and vegetables (such as squash and bell peppers). These are examples of low acidic, and low fiber sources of vitamin C that are ideal for the ulcerative colitis diet. Removing Seeds from tomatoes and strawberries using a peeler is also necessary to avoid aggravating sensitive areas of the colon during digestion. Benefits of vitamin C may include protection against immune system deficiencies, reducing flair-ups, and preventing cardiovascular disease.

 

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